George Carlin and Jacque Fresco discuss the dangers of feeding bullshit to the impressionable minds of children.

A Mind Without Questions is a Slave

Bullshit is the glue, that binds us as a nation. Where would we be without our safe, familiar, American bullshit? Land of the free, home of the brave, the American dream, all men are equal, justice is blind, the press is free, your vote counts, business is honest, the good guys win, the police are on your side, god is watching you, your standard of living will never decline… and everything is going to be just fine— The official national bullshit story.

I call it the American okie doke. Every one, every one of those items is provably untrue at one level or another, but we believe them because they’re pounded into our heads from the time we’re children. That’s what they do with that kind of thing—pound it into the heads of kids, ‘cause they know the children are much too young to be able to muster an intellectual defense against a sophisticated idea like that, and they know that up to a certain age children believe everything their parents tell them.

And as a result, they never learn to question things. Children should be taught to question everything. Children should taught to question everything they read, everything they hear. Children should be taught to question authority.

Older Isn’t Always Wiser

When I was a young man growing up in New York City, I refused to pledge allegiance to the flag. Of course I was sent to the principal’s office. And he asked me, ‘Why don’t you want to pledge allegiance? Everybody does!’

I said, ‘Everybody once believed the Earth was flat but that doesn’t make it so.’ I explained that America owed everything it has to other cultures and other nations. and that I would rather pledge allegiance to the Earth and everyone on it.

The Game is Corrupt

Then came the crash of 1929, which began what we now call “The Great Depression”. I found it difficult to understand why millions were out of work, homeless, starving while all the factories were sitting there. The resources were unchanged.

It was then that I realized that the rules of the economic game were inherently invalid.

Shortly after, came World War II where various nations took turns systematically destroying each other. I later calculated that all the destruction and wasted resources spent on that war could have easily provided for every human need on the planet.